COVID-19 (novel coronavirus)

Information and advice for students, whānau, and the education sector.

This page was updated on Thursday 9 April at 12:20 pm.

Early learning services, schools, kura and tertiary education providers closed at midnight on Wednesday 25 March for four weeks. 

There is information below for essential workers on options for caring for their children during the lockdown period.

Essential businesses - covid19.govt.nz

Home-based care options for children aged 0-14 of essential workers

School holidays were brought forward to run from 30 March through to 14 April inclusive. We are working with a number of partners to support schools and kura to deliver distance learning when Term 2 begins on 15 April.  

Covid19: Government moving quickly to roll out learning from home

Making learning from home accessible to Māori learners and whānau

Refer to the Ministry of Health for health information, and the Government's dedicated website for all other information and advice:

COVID-19 – Ministry of Health

Unite against COVID-19 - covid19.govt.nz

Travel and Visa information

This section was updated on Friday 3 April at 3:40 pm.

The Government is working to safely repatriate foreign nationals while New Zealand is in lockdown. International students can now choose to leave New Zealand on scheduled commercial or foreign-government assisted charter flights.

In order to depart New Zealand international students must have a confirmed booking and a valid international ticket to travel to either Auckland or Christchurch airports. These students may travel to the airport by private vehicle, public transport or a take a single domestic flight.

Educational providers are responsible for ensuring students and their parents are fully informed of the relevant risks associated with international travel right now. They must also have in place:

  • A transfer of care plan for under 18 students that is agreed to in writing (digitally) by the student’s parent or legal guardian.
  • Appropriate and safe supervision for students under 18 to ensure that the wellbeing of the student is maintained during their transfer of care.

FAQs for signatories - students on commercial or repatriation flights

If you need some support for students to be met off domestic flights at Auckland or Christchurch International Airports, and/or support with accommodation, chaperoning, domestic to international transfers, then please contact:

Auckland: Debbie McGregor, email dandmmarketing@outlook.com, Mobile: 027 415 0425

Christchurch: Tina Hartung, email TinaHartung1@icloud.com, Mobile: 021 350 936

Please include the following information in your email:

  • Student name:
  • Student mobile number:
  • School key contact name:
  • School key contact mobile:
  • Request for support (chaperoning/accommodation/transfers – please specify)

Keep updated on travel restrictions through the New Zealand Immigration website:

COVID-19 response – Immigration New Zealand

 

Distance learning

This section was updated on Thursday 9 April at 12.30

We have surveyed schools and about half say they are well set up currently for distance learning using the internet. We are working with a range of partners to support all schools and students with distance learning.

Increasing the number of students who have internet access and devices

We have worked with schools to identify students who are likely to need additional resources, devices, internet connectivity or hard copy learning materials. We will be targeting the greatest need first, with an initial focus on connecting students in senior secondary school working towards NCEA – to minimise disruption for those working towards a qualification – and on those with greatest need due to disadvantage. We will then move down the year levels from years 10 to 1.

Delivering hard copy packs of materials for different year levels

We know many teachers have already provided students with material for home. We are providing hard packs for children who don’t have technology at home, particularly in rural areas.

Launching two television channels

Two television channels are due to start from April 15. They will broadcast education-related content – one for English medium and one for Māori medium, including content targeted for Pacific and other communities.

More online resources for parents

We are enhancing the two online spaces went live recently: 

These websites have resources for parents and whānau, teachers and leaders spanning early learning through to senior secondary, and new material will be added to these over the coming weeks.

We are also fast-tracking ways to connect Learning Support Coordinators with families remotely.

Tertiary providers are moving to full distance learning as quickly as possible.

 

Advice for early learning services

This section was updated on Thursday 9 April at 4:20 pm.

All early learning services closed at midnight on 25 March for four weeks. 

COVID-19 wage subsidy

Can I get the COVID-19 wage subsidy?

If your revenue has fallen by 30% or more, you may be eligible for the COVID-19 wage subsidy to help pay your staff during the lockdown. This subsidy is paid by Work and Income.

Work and Income COVID-19 wage subsidy

What are my obligations if I receive the COVID-19 wage subsidy?

If you receive the subsidy, you are expected to do your absolute best to pay your early learning staff hopefully at 100%, but certainly at least 80% of their usual wage/salary. If for some reason you can’t pay at least 80%, you must pay the employee at least the full value of the subsidy (unless that’s more than what the employee would usually get, in which case pay the employee what they usually get). 

You can expect employees to continue working from home if and as required under these conditions. For example, teachers and educators could send helpful info and tips to support families at home with their children’s individual needs, or work on the curriculum. 

Work and Income is receiving a high volume of calls, so please be patient if you call them. Have a look at their website if you need information in the first instance.

Work and Income COVID-19 wage subsidy

How do contractors and self-employed staff apply for the COVID-19 wage subsidy?

Contractors and self-employed staff need to apply for the subsidy themselves. They need to declare that they have had a 30% revenue loss at the time of application.

Relief teachers applying for the COVID-19 wage subsidy

Do I apply for the COVID-19 wage subsidy on behalf of my relief teachers?

It depends on whether or not the relief teacher is employed by you, is contracted or self-employed, or works for an agency. Please see the different types of employment in the table below, showing who should apply for the wage subsidy in each scenario.

My relief teacher has multiple employers. Who applies for their COVID-19 wage subsidy?

If a relief teacher has multiple employers, including being a contractor or self-employed, each employer can apply for the wage subsidy for the same relief teacher, so long as they meet the other conditions for the scheme, such as a 30% decline in actual or predicted revenue.  

Here’s some examples of scenarios that might apply:

Situation

Who claims for the wage subsidy?

Jo works for one single independent early learning service provider

The early learning provider should list Jo in its application for the wage subsidy.

Anika works for several single independent ECE service providers

Multiple early learning providers can all name Anika in their applications.

Hana works for one large umbrella service provider who have their own pool of relievers

The umbrella provider should list Hana in its application for the wage subsidy.

Mei is on the books of a relief teacher agency

This will depend on whether Mei is legally employed by the agency. Relief teacher agencies are eligible to apply. She should check with the agency if she unsure.

Chris is independent, i.e. works for herself as a sole trader

As a sole trader/self-employed, Chris can apply on her own behalf.

Eddie works in a combination of above scenarios, and/or a school

Eddie can be listed on multiple employer applications and as a sole trader/self-employed.

How are the fluctuating hours of relief teaching work calculated for the COVID-19 payments?

By nature, relief teachers’ hours of work vary. The Work and Income website has some information on working out what rate to apply for when submitting an application and how to calculate the subsidy. 

Note that only businesses that meet certain criteria are eligible to receive the wage subsidy. To check if you are eligible, refer to the Work and Income website.

Wage Subsidy - Work and Income
Common questions on the Wage Subsidy - Work and Income

What if I am not eligible for the COVID-19 wage subsidy?

If you are not eligible for the wage subsidy, there is other emergency Work and Income assistance available.

Work and Income emergency COVID-19 pages 

Work and Income childcare subsidy

Can I get the Work and Income childcare subsidy?

As all early learning services are closed during the COVID-19 lockdown, Work and Income has had to suspend the childcare assistance subsidies they pay to providers on behalf of their clients (parents and caregivers). They’re doing this because they have no legal authority to continue these payments while early learning services are closed.

Childcare assistance stopped from 6 April 2020. Providers won’t need to repay any payments made prior to this. Early learning services will continue to receive their usual Ministry of Education ECE operational funding during the lockdown period.

Suspending childcare assistance payments is a temporary measure only. 

MSD sincerely hope you can hold enrolments for their clients open until we move into a reduced COVID-19 Alert Level. They’re also working on the expectation that you will not be charging parent fees during this time. 

If you have any questions, please call the MSD Provider Line on 0800 776 843.

Employment/workforce issues

Can I expect my employees to work from home?

For many businesses and workers, there is a lot of work that can still be done at home during lockdown. If an employer asks an employee to work from home, the employee should consider this request in good faith, bearing in mind the circumstances at home and whether they can do this safely.

Activities you might want to ask your staff to think about:

  • Write learning stories
  • Take notes on any children’s behavioural needs
  • Send individualised info and tips to families to support children at home
  • Plan and work on the curriculum
  • Get appraisals and teacher registration up to date
  • Engage in professional development
  • Video themselves reading a book or singing songs, and upload to a platform like Storypark and Educa for children to watch from home.

Read more on the Employment NZ website about changing an employee’s working arrangements.

Changing an employee’s working arrangements – Employment New Zealand website 

Can staff working from home take leave during lockdown?

New Zealanders are not able to go on holiday during the Alert Level 4 lockdown, but nevertheless the question of leave may come up. Arrangements should be made in good faith, with the needs of your service weighed against the well-being of your staff.

All employers, including those using the COVID-19 wage subsidy scheme, must follow legal requirements when making decisions about leave. They cannot unlawfully require or compel employees named in their COVID-19 wage subsidy application to use their leave entitlements.

Employers and employees may agree to annual leave during temporary closures of a workplace, such as during the lockdown. If an employer and employee cannot agree, an employer may direct annual leave be taken if the employee has a leave entitlement and they have first discussed this with the employee and provided 14 days’ notice. (Note that employees only become entitled to annual leave at the end of every 12 months of employment. Employees can’t be directed to take annual leave they are accruing in their current year of employment). Please note that employees must also be given the opportunity to take at least two weeks of their annual holidays continuously.

Read more on the Employment NZ website about taking annual holidays 

What if I have a dispute with my employee?

If you have a dispute with an employee, or have an employment/payroll problem, please contact the Labour Inspectorate through the Ministry of Innovation, Business and Employment website.

Please bear in mind that it is a small team dealing with a lot of queries, and that they will get back to you as soon as they can.

Labour Inspectorate – Employment New Zealand website

Parent fees and rent charges

Can I continue to charge parents fees or introduce new fees to help cover costs during lockdown?

We appreciate that many parents and families are facing considerable pressures at this time, including substantial or complete loss of income. Paying additional fees may be not be possible for some.

The Government is continuing to support early learning service providers through ECE funding subsidy with no clawbacks during the lockdown period, and access to the Covid19 age subsidy.

Therefore we ask you to seriously reconsider charging parent fees at this time. 

Can services get discounted rent for their premises during lockdown?

We understand that the current situation is difficult for everyone. We also recognise that we have asked services to review policies of collecting parent fees at this time, which may place additional financial stress on some early learning services. 

We are aware that some early learning services with commercial lease agreements have advised their landlords they will be stopping rent payments during this lockdown period, or have asked their landlords for rent relief. 

As ECE operational funding will continue to be paid to early learning services as usual, and with some services having access to additional COVID-19 age subsidy support from Work and Income, we strongly encourage tenants (services) and landlords to constructively work through options together in good faith. 

Good faith means dealing with each other honestly, openly, and without misleading each other. Like all relationships it requires parties to be active, responsive and communicative.

If you have a commercial lease agreement for your early learning service, you may like to seek independent legal advice about the agreement obligations.

Stay up to date with COVID-19 information for businesses:

COVID-19 - Business.govt.nz 

Entering a service premises

Can I work from my service premises, or ask my staff to, if no one else is there?

No. While New Zealand is in lockdown, all early learning services and schools are considered non-essential services and should be closed. There should be no visits to services to do work, cleaning, organising and similar tasks, as these are not considered essential. 

Can I enter my premises to feed the pets there?

There are some circumstances where a visit to a service might be necessary, such as feeding and caring for the animals at the service to ensure they stay safe and healthy. 

You will not need written permission to make visits to feed animals, but please exercise caution in doing so and follow the physical distancing and hygiene rules.

Wellbeing and welfare of children and families

I’m concerned about the wellbeing of children and families at home during lockdown. How can I help them?

We have updated the wellbeing information on our website to better reflect how the COVID-19 response has changed over the last weeks. Included in there are three new tip sheets which you can share with parents, caregivers and teachers:

If you know someone who might be struggling in your early learning service community, there are a large range of supports in place that may be able to assist including:

Information in languages other than English:

If you believe a child is in immediate danger, call NZ Police on 111. 

If you are worried about a child and want to make a referral or report of concern, call Oranga Tamariki using 0508 EDASSIST (0508 332 774) or email edassist@ot.govt.nz.

I’m concerned about some of our families not being able to provide themselves with adequate food at this time. How can I help them?

If you are aware there are people in your community who cannot get access to essential goods such as food, they can contact the local Emergency Coordination Centres (ECC), part of Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Groups. These groups coordinate the regional multi-agency response and provide a range of support activities.  This is intended for people who don’t have any other options available to them and operates 7 days a week from 7am to 7pm.

CDEM Group 0800 numbers for essential supplies - National Emergency Management Agency website

You can also email the following people/contacts:

Further welfare supports include:

  • The All of Government Welfare Number (0800 779 997) is available 7 days a week, providing welfare information and support for individuals in isolation.
  • The Government has made additional funding available to support the wellbeing of disabled people who usually access MSD funded Community Participation and Very High Needs services. Refer Disability Directorate update for 30 March 2020.
  • Further information on MSD supports Supporting providers through COVID-19 - MSD website.
  • Careers NZ and IHC have launched wecare.kiwi to make it easy to care for and about each other. If you’re on your own during the lockdown, or caring for a vulnerable person, you may need some support – We Care Kiwi website.
  • A Government factsheet with detail regarding welfare support is available on COVID-19.govt.nz website. Getting the help and support you need [PDF, 244KB].

Licence applications

Can I still make licence applications during lockdown?

Licence applications that have been received prior to the lockdown period cannot be progressed if a site visit is still required, as licensing staff are not listed as essential workers. It will not be possible for other applications to be progressed within the usual 30 working day timeframe, and we will not be issuing probationary licences until the lockdown period has been lifted. Unless you were licensed prior to the lockdown, you cannot receive funding. Regional staff will contact you as soon as they can after the lockdown is lifted.

Can I send in future licence applications during lockdown?

You can continue to send future licence applications to local regional offices via email, but applications will not be progressed until after the lockdown period. As noted above, licensing staff are not listed as essential workers so are not able to complete an onsite visit during the lockdown period.  It is unlikely that applications will be able to be processed within the usual 30 working day timeframe once the lockdown is lifted.  Please be aware that applicants may also face difficulties in obtaining all required information for a new application such as health reports, fire evacuation schemes and confirmation of building requirements.

Once the lockdown is lifted we will be prioritising assisting existing licensed services to resume operations. Regional offices may be able to assess applications but will advise you of their capacity on receipt of your application.

Can my licence be amended during lockdown?

We may be able to be process licenses to be amended by regional offices that you send via email. These will be assessed on a case by case basis depending on the nature of the amendment sought. Regional staff will advise you of their capacity to complete these on receipt of your application.

Applications to change the identity of the service provider will be processed on a case by case basis depending on the licence status, any regulatory action pending, and any other concerns about the licence or service provider as required by regulations. Vendors and purchasers should seek legal advice in light of New Zealand Law Society guidance that all settlements should be deferred until 10 working days after a level 2 alert is imposed, and that any settlement involving physical movement of people is considered unlawful during lockdown.  

What if I want to apply for other licence classifications during lockdown?

We are working on our responses to other licence reclassifications, including for services looking to move to full licences from provisional or probationary licence status during this time. Further guidance will be issued. In the meantime we ask that you are patient with us. 

Children starting school 

You may have some children at your service who have been preparing to start school during this lockdown period. Legally, a child can start school from age 5, and must be enrolled from age 6.

We encourage you to talk to parents and families about transition for these children and what their preferences at this time may be. They may prefer to keep their children enrolled with your service for longer, rather than enrolling in school at this time. This would help reduce any stress that some children and parents might be experiencing about starting school. 

Parents / families who want to enrol their children in school, and those with children about to turn 6, should discuss with their intended schools about any transition and support available at this time.

What if a child turns 5 during the lockdown period?

A child has a legal right to enrol and “attend” school from age 5 (taking into account any cohort entry provisions a school has put in place).  You can let parents know they have the option to delay enrolment, having the next 12 months (until their child’s 6th birthday) to meet their legal obligations.

If parents choose to delay their child’s enrolment at school, we will continue to fund services and ngā kohānga reo while they remain enrolled in early learning until the day before their 6th birthday.


What if a child who hasn’t started school yet turns 6 during the lockdown period?

From the age of 6 there is a legal requirement for every child to be enrolled and to attend a registered school. There are no provisions in the emergency legislation that suspends that requirement, so if a child turns 6 during the lockdown they need to be enrolled in a school.  

What documents are required to enrol a child in school?

For parents who choose to enrol their children in school at this time, schools usually ask to sight evidence such as birth certificates to facilitate the enrolment process. Sighting documentation such as a birth certificate isn’t practicable at this time.  However a photograph of the document or provision of the child’s NSN number could support their enrolment. It would be helpful if you could let the parents of these children know the NSN for their child. This can be passed on to the school to support enrolment during the lockdown period. The school will either complete the enrolment remotely or maintain a manual record until the child starts to attend in person.

Parents will make the final decision about what is best for their children at this time, however it would be beneficial for parents to know that the option to keep them at their service is available.

Learning support and resources

What kind of support am I required to offer families at home?

We know you want to find ways to support families and their children’s learning while they are at home during lockdown. There are no official requirements as to what this can look like, and we encourage you to make the most of your communication channels, ability to work from home, and the learning resources we are making available.

Are learning support staff still available?

Yes, our learning support staff are available to support services and families during the lockdown period. You can set up online meetings with our early intervention staff via Zoom and Skype.

Our support staff will continue to check in with children and their caregivers and whanau. We’ll also check in with kaiako where possible, to provide guidance and support.

While this may look different to the support we usually provide, we’ll continue to work with the adults in the children’s lives to help support children’s daily routines. This may include ongoing coaching conversations with parents to help them adjust actions and plans and celebrate successes.

Resources for learning from home

What digital resources are available for families wanting to continue their children’s learning from home?

We’ve launched two new websites to support the children and young people’s learning, their families and staff in early learning: 

Learning from home
Ki te Ao Mārama

Please encourage your staff and families to visit and make use of these websites, which we will continue to update with new resources.

The Inclusive Education website has 28 guides to help recognise, plan for and meet the learning and wellbeing needs of diverse learners. 


The Learning Support Coordinators - Education Conversation website will take you to resources that may be useful for teachers. Topics include partnering with parents and whānau.

If you have any ideas for wellbeing and learning at home resources and tip sheets that would help others please contact learning.supportmailbox@education.govt.nz or phone the Learning Support enquiries line at 0800 622 222.

Please contact your local office if you’re concerned about a child or young person’s learning support needs during lockdown.

Are there any resources available that don’t require Internet access?

Some children may have difficulty accessing books and resources while their early learning service is closed. We are working on providing some basic kit to homes when we can source this. We will be emailing a small number of services receiving targeted funding to work with us on this and will provide updates.

Because of the constraints on the supply of books and resources in New Zealand at this time, our early focus will be on those services receiving targeted funding where there is greatest disadvantage as identified through the data we already collect.

Professional development

What are some free online personal development opportunities for teachers to engage in?

If you run an immersion or bilingual centre, you may be eligible for Whakapiki i te reo. This is a 6-12 month professional development programme. For enquiries, contact Shane Walsh at S.Walsh2@massey.ac.nz.

Some educators recommend the free Pennie Brownlee and Kimberley Crisp podcasts.

Please contact your local regional SELO lead for further professional development opportunities:

Tai Tokerau

sacha.cherrington@education.govt.nz
09 436 8929

Auckland

sarah.morrison@education.govt.nz
09 632 9528

ngawai.beazley@education.govt.nz
09 632 9579

Waikato

terri.burridge@education.govt.nz
07 858 7172

Bay of Plenty/Rotorua/Taupo

renee.cleaver@education.govt.nz
07 349 8319

Hawke's Bay/Tairawhiti

helen.keats@education.govt.nz
06 831 0660

Taranaki/Whanganui/Manawatū 

sarah.brindle@education.govt.nz
06 350 9856

Wellington

marnie.hainsworth@education.govt.nz
04 463 7575

angela.coutts@education.govt.nz
04 439 4629

Nelson/Marlborough/West Coast

megan.edwards@education.govt.nz
03 539 1528

Canterbury

paul.habinshuti@education.govt.nz
03 378 7522

Otago/Southland

julie.crosswell@education.govt.nz
03 471 5218

Tips for using the Internet from home

Is there anything I can do to improve my Internet connection for working from home?

Our IT team have put together some tips for improved connectivity at home which you can also share with your staff.

Wifi issues

Check your home wifi setup for performance/speed issues before assuming there is an issue with the connection from the house to the internet.

  • Run a speed test at www.speedtest.net to establish a baseline, and repeat after making any change (see below) to check for improvement.
  • Power off your home router every morning, and leave off for 30 secs before powering back on (don’t press the reset button this will reset the device settings!).
  • Turn off, or disable wifi on, unused devices where possible, especially older devices that run at slower wifi speeds.
  • Decrease the physical distance between your device & the wifi router. Line of sight is best.
  • Use an Ethernet cable on devices where possible to reduce wifi load (especially smart tvs, gaming consoles). Plug these into a spare LAN port on your router. 

Data allowance/cap issues

  • Check you are not already on an uncapped data plan. If unsure, contact your provider.
  • Some providers have made uncapped offers to rural and remote customers for off peak (nightime) hours. Consider shifting non time-critical downloads such as computer patching to these time periods.
  • Check what options are available for the address at https://broadbandmap.nz/, and if you are not on the cheapest/best option, you could consider changing provider (this is considered an essential service).

In some remote areas, the connection speed AND the amount of data is a hard technical constraint based on the capacity of the technology used (such as satellite or “point to point” wireless). 

  • As a very rough indicator, if it requires an externally mounted antenna or dish it probably falls into this category.
  • If this is the situation for a teacher delivering distance learning, consider non-digital alternatives in the short term.

For mobile phone connections

  • The data plan on mobile phones is NOT covered by the removal of data caps.
  • Individual data plans vary significantly – high data usage on some plans over the allowance is very expensive.
  • For personal phones, consider changing to a different plan that better reflects new usage patterns. Often this can be done at no/little additional cost.
  • Use the app provided by your mobile phone supplier to track usage.
  • “Hotspotting” from a mobile phone is less efficient than using home wifi (aerials are smaller), so this will be slower.
  • If using for voice calls and running out of minutes, consider alternatives where possible such us email/messaging systems,

Here is some information and things to consider when choosing a video conferencing tool to support your work:

Video conferencing options

Flutracking

What is flutracking? How can I sign up?

Flutracking is an online survey which asks if you have had a fever or cough in the last week and which can help us track COVID-19. Registering online will help our surveillance efforts by providing early detection of community spread of the flu and also of COVID-19 symptoms.
 
We encourage people to register online at https://info.flutracking.net/.
 
This is a practical thing everyone can do to help us monitor flu and COVID-19 symptoms throughout NZ.

Television channels

Two television channels are due to start from April 15. They will broadcast education-related content – one for English medium and one for Māori medium, including content targeted for Pacific and other communities.

The broadcasts will run over six and a half hours during the day, and include content for early learners.

Funding

Ministry of Education ECE operational funding will continue to be paid to early learning services as usual, even though services are closed and there will be no children attending. Service’s operational funding will not be reduced during this time.  Next week we will provide an update on funding over the lockdown period, including FAQs to address enquires that we have received.

Home-based educators

Please note that educators who are contractors or self-employed need to apply for the COVID-19 Wage Subsidy themselves, rather than the home-based service they contract to or get work from.
To qualify for the wage subsidy, all applicants must also be able to meet other key criteria, such as:

  • At least 30% decline in actual or predicted revenue (over the period of a month when compared with the same month last year), due to the effects of COVID-19
  • Taking active steps to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on their business
  • Making best efforts to retain employees and pay them a minimum of 80% of their normal income for the subsidy period.

Where to find the latest COVID-19 information

There is a lot of information out there, and it is changing daily. The best way to stay up to date with COVID-19 and how it is affecting New Zealanders is through the dedicated Government website COVID19.govt.nz. To stay up to date with COVID-19 and the early learning sector in particular, refer to our Early Learning Bulletins and keep checking these webpages, as we’ll be updating them.

We encourage you to share the Early Learning Bulletin with your staff and parents, and recommend they subscribe themselves. That way, they will have access to the same information that you do.

Subscribe to the bulletin

You can also find information on these websites:

Ministry of Health – COVID-19

Work and Income

Employment New Zealand

Advice for schools/kura

This section was updated on Thursday 9 April at 12.16 pm.

Schools closed at midnight on Wednesday 25 March for four weeks.

Support for distance learning

When Term 2 starts on April 15 schools will be open for distance learning but not physically open for staff to work at the schools.

We know many of you have already completed take home packs for your students and/or have implemented your distance learning programmes.

Online resources

To support distance learning, we are enhancing the resources available in two relatively new online spaces: Learning from home and Ki te Ao Mārama.

They include a range of resources for parents and whānau, teachers and leaders, for early learning through to senior secondary. We will continue to work with you to develop and add to these resources over the coming weeks. 
 
Ki te Ao Mārama has been developed to support those students learning te reo Māori and for those in kōhanga reo, kura and Māori medium settings. 

You can use both online spaces to point students to activities that you think would help them learn at home. We are also adding planning tools to support you in your future planning for distance learning online.
 
If you have any suggestions that would help others or requests for specific types of resources for the website please contact Curriculum.Design@education.govt.nz.

For ideas and feedback that would support learning te reo Māori at home and for those learning in te reo Māori, please contact TeReo.MaoriGroup@education.govt.nz.

Access to devices and the internet

We have worked with principals to identify students who are likely to need additional resources, devices, internet connectivity or hard copy learning materials, to continue their learning from home when the school terms resumes on April 15.

We won’t be able to meet everyone’s needs all at once but we will continue to work with you to provide as much as we can, as it is available. We will be targeting the greatest need first. We will focus on connecting students in senior secondary school working towards NCEA – to minimise disruption for those working towards a qualification – and on those with greatest need due to disadvantage. We will then move down the year levels from years 10 to 1

Hard copy packs

We know many of you have already provided students with material for home. We are providing hard packs for children who don’t have technology at home.

Television channels

Two television channels are due to start from April 15. They will broadcast education-related content – one for English medium and one for Māori medium, including content targeted for Pacific and other communities.

The broadcasts will run over six and a half hours during the day, and include specialised content for a broad curriculum that includes movement, music, physical education, wellbeing, numeracy, literacy and science through an integrated approach to curriculum.

Helpdesk for distance learning

We have set up a Connected Learning Advisory helpdesk to assist leaders, teachers, kaiako and whānau to make full use of the online environments and resources, as they provide for a continuity of learning for their students and tamariki. CORE Education, which runs the helpdesk, will provide this and other online support from 8 am to 5 pm on business days.

To contact the Helpdesk, call 0800 700 401. To speak with the Helpdesk in te reo Māori, call 0508 294 462.

The Helpdesk numbers are available on Learning from Home and Ki te Ao Mārama.

PLD Supports

If you have a current PLD allocation, you can repurpose your existing hours, with your facilitators, so that they can support you to prepare for distance learning.

You can also request new PLD to support with distance learning. To date, this has been through emailing the pld.enquiries@education.govt.nz mailbox to register your interest. However, we are working with the Regional Office teams to gather further information on which schools and kura might need PLD support, and they may be in contact with you in the coming days.

The Term 1 PLD round has been put on hold until further notice. All proposals that have been submitted will remain in the system – we will update you at a later date to inform you of the process that will be followed.

NZQA 

NZQA and the Ministry of Education will help schools and wharekura develop effective plans for NCEA assessment and qualifications for students affected by COVID-19, including supporting remote learning. Work is also underway to make sure that all qualifications, awards and pathways (including University Entrance and Vocational Pathways) will remain available.  
 
For students taking part in Trades Academies and Gateway Programmes, further information can be found at Youth Guarantee website.

Microsoft & Google technology support sessions for schools establishing distance learning

To assist schools who have any technology support questions (where you can ask anything) Microsoft & Google are holding online meetings to support schools establishing or offering distance learning for their students.
 
Alternatively schools can get assistance from their IT Service Provider.

Some useful Microsoft links are: Microsoft Remote-Learning and https://samuelmcneill.com/2020/03/16/the-ultimate-collection-of-resources-for-remote-learning-with-microsoft-365/.
 
Schools can participate in Google Hangouts meeting drop in sessions at This location. Other useful Google links are: Teach from Home and the Learning Hub.

Here is some information and things to consider when choosing a video conferencing tool to support your work:

Video conferencing options

Attendance codes

As school-led learning will continue at students’ homes over the lockdown period, schools and kura remain open for instruction.

This is except for the school holidays of 28 March to 14 April.

  • For school administrators, it is recommended you use attendance code F in respect of students who are undertaking school-led learning from home. Code F is ‘student attending an offsite course/class (the student is not in class but is on a legitimate off-site school-based course).
  • If parents or caregivers are choosing not to have their child undertake school-led learning from home, it is recommended this is coded as an unjustified absence.
  • In the event a student’s absence is unexplained or they are unwell, principals can continue to use their own professional judgement in using codes ‘J’, ‘M’, ‘T’ or ‘E’.
  • For students undertaking mandatory self-isolation, the Ministry recommends using the Justified Absence code ‘J’. Mandatory self-isolation – Ministry of Health

If your school has been, or will in the future, be closed while the health authorities trace and contact anyone who might have been affected, or where all staff and students have been asked to undertake self-isolation, attendance should not be marked.

Instead the school should be recorded as closed in your Student Management System calendar.

Payroll

School employees will continue to be paid with no change to the regularity of payments every fortnight. We are working through the detail at the moment.
 
For payroll related queries please contact support@novopay.govt.nz

A special School Bulletin was issued on 31 March updating schools on a number of payroll matters:

Ministry Bulletin for School Leaders | He Pitopito Kōrero

Staffing provisions

We have further updated our information online for all staffing provisions here – Staffing provisions

Annual Reporting and School Audit Process

We know schools may not be able to submit their annual financial statements to their auditors by 31 March 2020, or participate as you normally would in the audit process. We accept that this will mean some schools will be late with meeting their statutory obligations. Schools will not be penalised if they are unable to submit their annual financial statements, or complete their audits on time.

The Office of the Auditor General is talking to relevant agencies, including the Treasury, about what the current circumstances mean for everyone and how they affect the usual accountability obligations of public entities, including schools.
 
Auditing in the context of COVID-19 - Office of the Auditor General

Supporting the wellbeing of students

A number of your community may be feeling worried about COVID-19 (novel coronavirus). 

Here is some advice about how you can support the wellbeing of your students and their families:

COVID-19 and wellbeing

More health advice is available on the Ministry of Health website:

COVID-19 health advice for the public – Ministry of Health

International students – critical incidents, homestay issues and supporting mental wellbeing

Guidance on responding to pastoral care issues for that may arise for international students during lockdown:

Critical incidents, homestay issues and supporting mental wellbeing

Access to school sites

Schools and early learning services are not considered essential services under Alert Level 4.
 
Now that the Secretary for Education has established the appropriate boundaries for acceptable decisions, she has delegated this to the regional Directors of Education. If you need emergency access to school property, please fill out the request form [Word Document] and send to your local Director of Education who will make a decision and get back to you.

Distance or online learning providers (e.g. printers, devices, IT) are also considered to be essential services at this time. This includes supply chains. Any provider who is assisting you to deliver distance learning and needs access to your school will also need to fill out the request form.
 
The only circumstances where the Directors will consider approving access are for:

  1. Securing the site
  2. Access to IT servers
  3. Essential contractors in the event of damage at a school
  4. Removing fire hazards
  5. Use of school’s site for health purposes relating to COVID-19

Such access must be essential and cannot be precautionary. Requests for grounds and or pool maintenance, and school cleaning for example do not meet this criteria.

Other essential services

In addition to the specific approvals delegated to the Secretary for Education as noted above, there are already a number of essential services listed on the Covid19 website which may apply to those wanting to access school sites for other reasons (please read through the additional decisions and exemptions list which is updated regularly). For example under Public safety and national security, NZ Police and Fire and Emergency can access a school site without having to gain permission from the Secretary for Education. Further examples relevant to schools include:

  • Security - we have had questions about situations that need immediate attention. Security is considered an essential service, even if security services are being provided in relation to a premise for a non-essential service (i.e. a school). This includes night patrols or usually contracted security providers. An example of this would be an alarm that has been activated in the middle of the night.

We have clarified with MBIE the situation for schools which don’t have contracted security services to respond to alarms. If your alarm is activated, a principal or designated staff member can enter school grounds to shut off the alarm system. In doing so you must take the necessary health measures, comply with any region-specific travel measures and should not have to travel far to get to your school (i.e. travel locally).

  • Locksmiths - can undertake essential work on emergency call-outs and essential activity to maintain the security of premises/personal properties.
  • Travel to look after animals - is allowed, as long as you take the necessary health measures and comply with any region-specific travel measures.

Turf maintenance, on the other hand, is not considered an essential service and should not be undertaken at this time.

Only essential people to go on site

Remember in any situation only essential people should go onto the site. They must stick to the rules around physical distancing (ie 2 metres from anybody) and good hygiene and they must do so only when absolutely necessary.
 
For health and safety risks to do with construction that occur during the lockdown period, schools should contact their Property Advisor in the first instance for advice.

Advice for tertiary providers/whare wānanga

This section was updated on Friday 3 April at 12:00pm.

Alert 4

The general guidelines on alert level 4 are as follows:

  • People are instructed to stay at home.
  • All educational facilities are to close.
  • Businesses closed except for essential services (e.g. supermarkets, pharmacies, clinics) and lifeline utilities.

About the alert system - covid19.govt.nz

Under level 4, the following guidelines apply to all Tertiary Education Organisations:

  • Your number one priority should be the welfare of your students and staff, and ensuring that they can self-isolate in accordance with new Ministry of Health (MoH) guidelines as per the PM’s announcement.
  • All education and research services requiring face to face contact should be suspended immediately. As much delivery as possible should be shifted online, so long as this can be managed by staff working at home.
  • Many students (including international students) are likely to have to remain in residential accommodation, either because this is their only available accommodation, or because they are unable to travel home. Providing services to these students so that they can self-isolate is an essential service. This includes on-campus medical services, catering, pastoral care and other services.

Under Alert Level 4, international students are now able to leave New Zealand on scheduled commercial or foreign-government assisted charter flights. For more information on other travel criteria, visit Update on domestic travel criteria for foreign nationals returning home

  • Educational providers must ensure certain requirements are met under the Code. These include:
    • Clear and timely communication with students and parents about travel. Parents and students should only be consenting to travel with an informed understanding of the relevant risks and the possibility of changing plans.
    • A transfer of care plan for under 18 students that is agreed to in writing (digitally) by the student’s parent or legal guardian.
    • Appropriate and safe supervision for students under 18 to ensure that the wellbeing of the student is maintained during their transfer of care.

We have included a check list on the following page to assist you with students under 18.

  • Residential facilities, such as halls of residence, hostels, and homestays, must support remaining students to self-isolate and must strictly enforce personal distancing and hygiene requirements, in accordance with MoH guidelines.
  • For students who had only organised short-term accommodation arrangements, any alternative arrangements which had not been put in place before the lockdown will not be possible and students will need to remain where they are for the duration of the lockdown, with the same standard of care and support.
  • Security guards to protect property and persons in residential facilities and on campus are considered an essential service.
  • Medical research required for combatting COVID-19 is an essential service. 
  • All staff not working in essential services should be sent home. This includes all senior executives. Vulnerable staff who are providing essential services should be sent home and their roles filled by others.
  • All TEOs should comply with any instructions from authorised government officials including in relation to requisitions and rationing.
  • An up to date list of what is deemed an essential service can be found on covid19.govt.nz 

    Essential services relevant to tertiary providers can be found under several areas of the list.  For example:

  • Accommodation covers “Any entity that provides accommodation services for essential workers, isolation/quarantine, and emergency housing”. This includes halls of residence,  hostels, and homestays.
  • Primary industries covers “Any entity whose closure would jeopardise the maintenance of animal health or welfare standards”. This includes caring for animals in research facilities.
  • Security “is considered an essential service, even if security services are being provided in relation to a premise for a non-essential service”. This includes on campus security.
  • For all those involved in essential services, the aim should be to minimise the number of different staff involved in each service. For example, a single staff member should be assigned to care for animals during the lockdown, rather than a rotation of several staff.   

    All staff going on site should follow Ministry of Health guidelines for physical distancing (e.g. remain 2 metres apart at all times).  Any vulnerable person (e.g. over 70 or with a pre-existing condition) or anyone exhibiting symptoms of the virus should remain in self isolation and should be excluded from any on-site activities.

    All TEOs should assume that they will continue to be funded at their 2020 Investment Plan and Fees Free levels until the end of 2020.

    Government education agencies are moving to remote working and will remain in operation.

    Government agencies are working on a range of ways to support TEOs and students through this stage of COVID-19 and we will announce further guidance and measures as these are developed. 

    We are also providing regular bulletins for tertiary providers as the situation evolves. 

COVID-19 Tertiary Providers bulletins

 

Pastoral care codes of practice

Much of the advice and information detailed below relates to requirements in the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 or the Education (Pastoral Care of Domestic Tertiary Students) Interim Code of Practice 2019, which are administered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA).

While there are some differences in the specific requirements set out in the two codes, the principle informing the outcomes of each code is that students are able to make informed decisions about their health and wellbeing, and that students who are unwell or at risk are identified and supported to access appropriate help.

Find out more about the Code(s) and what responsibilities they set out for the pastoral care of your domestic and international students:

(Pastoral Care of Domestic Tertiary Students) Interim Code of Practice 2019 – NZQA

(Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 – NZQA

Advice to an unwell student or staff member

If you have a particular concern about a student or staff member, ask the student or staff member to call Healthline on 0800 358 5453 (or +64 9 358 5453 for international SIMS).

Healthline has translators and interpreters available 24/7 in 150 languages.

There are concerns some students may avoid going to a hospital for fear of cost. As COVID-19 is now a notifiable infectious disease, treatment for people who have, or who are suspected of having, COVID-19 is publicly funded under the infectious disease exception, to the extent appropriate in the circumstances to manage risks to other persons. This covers anyone in New Zealand, regardless of visa/citizenship status or length of time in the country.

Please note that the services are limited to:

  • Diagnosis.
  • Treatment of the person’s infectious or quarantinable disease.
  • Follow-up services.
  • Contact tracing services.
  • Surveillance of persons who are liable to quarantine under the Health Act 1956.

More information is available on the Ministry of Health’s website:

People receiving treatment for infectious diseases - Ministry of Health

Who is responsible for the care of students who are diagnosed with COVID-19 but do not require hospitalisation?

If a student is diagnosed with COVID-19 but does not require hospitalisation, they will need to follow the advice of the appropriate health professionals (such as their GP) for health care.

Providers must comply with the requirements in the pastoral care codes of practice. These include requirements to support all students with information and oversight of students at risk, as well as the more detailed requirements for domestic and international students in accommodation arranged by the provider.

How can providers support student wellbeing?

Emotional and mental health is important. Students may be feeling stressed or lonely, especially if they are self-isolating or are worried about family and friends overseas.

Providers should encourage students to reach out to their usual supports, like family and friends, and to talk about how they feel.

Under the international Code, providers must ensure that appropriate measures are put in place to address the needs and issues of international students as risk or with special needs.

Helpful advice for working out what measures may be appropriate can be found in NZQA’s international Code guidelines under Clause 25:

(Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016: 25. Process: international students at risk or with special needs – NZQA

The Interim Code also requires providers to assist all domestic tertiary students to manage their physical and mental health. This includes promoting awareness of wellbeing and mental health and practices that support good mental health and providing information about accessing health services themselves. Providers must also identify students at risk and ensure that there are effective pathways for assisting those students to access health services.

More advice for managing mental wellbeing regarding COVID-19 is available on the Ministry of Health website:

Managing your mental wellbeing – Ministry of Health

The Ministry of Health also offers a 24-hour ‘Need to talk?’ helpline staffed by mental health professionals. This is a free number or call or text at 1737 at any time:

Need to talk? Free phone or text 1737 – Ministry of Health  

There is also an NZ Government COVID-19 support factsheet, and more information on our website:

COVD-19 support factsheet – NZ Government    

More information about supporting the wellbeing of your community – Ministry of Education

What are the options for accommodation when self-isolating?

Self-isolation requires that someone has accommodation that is stable and limits their contact with any other people living in the same dwelling; e.g. a separate room and, if possible, separate bathroom.

A private home/flat is preferred over shared living arrangements such as hostels, boarding houses, residential halls, or even hotels.

In all cases, accommodation for international students must comply with the requirements in the Code by:

  • Ensuring that students aged under 18 are living with their parents or a residential caregiver who has been subject to safety checks; and
  • Ensuring that accommodation arranged by the signatory for students aged 18 and over is safe and in acceptable condition, and that effective communication is maintained with these students; and
  • Ensuring that other students aged 18 and over are directed to relevant advice and information that will enable the student to understand their rights and obligations as a tenant in New Zealand.

See Clause 26 of the Code for more information:

(Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016: 26. Process: accommodation – NZQA

NZQA’s Code of Practice guidelines can also be used to support compliance:

(Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 – NZQA

For domestic students in student accommodation (which has an exemption under the Residential Tenancies Act) who are required to self-isolate, outcomes 7 and 8 in the Interim Code require providers (and their contracted accommodation services) to provide peer support, information and advice on self-care and positive well-being, what action to take in an emergency and how to report health and safety concerns.

Under both codes, providers should also ensure that they regularly check on the welfare of students in self-isolation.

What if the student is in shared accommodation?

Students can still share accommodation while self-isolating, so long as they follow the appropriate self-isolation procedures.

As much as possible, students should limit contact with people other than the family members/companions they travelled with. They should avoid having visitors, but it is okay for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food.

If students are in a home where the other residents have not travelled (e.g., home / flat, a homestay, student accommodation), they should minimise close contact with the other residents by avoiding situations where they may have face-to-face contact closer than 1 metre for more than 15 minutes. The other household residents do not need to self-isolate provided these precautions are followed.

Students in self-isolation should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, pillows or other items with other people in the residence. After using these items, they should wash them thoroughly with soap and water, place them in the dishwasher for cleaning or wash them in the washing machine.

Providers should also give consideration to other residents, and support affected students into alternative temporary accommodation as appropriate

Self-isolation – Ministry of Health

Flexible arrangements for students 

All education and research services requiring face to face contact should be suspended immediately. As much delivery as possible should be shifted online, so long as this can be managed by staff working at home.

NZQA is enabling non-university tertiary education providers to temporarily support students who are affected by COVID-19 through online learning options.

If you have a programme that is approved for online delivery, please contact NZQA on 0800 697 296 for more information. This temporary approval does not apply to training schemes.

Student requests to defer their study

All education providers should apply the principles of fairness to ensure students are not disadvantaged from the current situation through no fault of their own. Providers should advise affected students about arrangements if they want to defer, including how their fees will be protected and how to apply for an updated Confirmation of Study/Offer.

In the event a student decides to withdraw from their programme of study, providers should ensure students are made aware of any potential refunds.

If providers have concerns about how changes may affect a student’s visa, contact Immigration New Zealand or check their website for general information about student visas relating to COVID-19: 

Travel and visa advice for students – Immigration New Zealand

COVID-19 – Immigration New Zealand

Managing attendance records for students

If students are following New Zealand Ministry of Health guidelines for self-isolation and cannot participate, attendance records should note that the absence is due to genuine circumstances.

If providers have concerns about how changes may affect a student’s visa, contact Immigration New Zealand or check their website for general information about student visas relating to COVID-19:

Travel and visa advice for students – Immigration New Zealand

COVID-19 – Immigration New Zealand

Visa-related questions

Temporary restrictions on travel remain in place as a precautionary measure.

If students or parents have visa-related questions, they should check Immigration New Zealand, which provides updates on the visa situation through its website:

Travel and visa advice for students – Immigration New Zealand

FAQs for signatories - students on commercial or repatriation flights

Financial assistance for the costs of changes to travel, fees, and accommodation for students

There is no direct government support available for costs incurred in relation to COVID-19. However, Code signatories have an important responsibility to ensure students are well informed, safe and properly cared for. This includes ensuring international students have the appropriate insurance in place.

NZQA advises Code signatories and international students to contact their insurance provider directly for up-to-date advice on any possible claims as a result of COVID-19. Providers may also choose to make financial aid available to students, and/or additional provision for students affected by COVID-19 and the related travel restrictions and self-isolation.

Signatories enrolling international students with exclusions on their insurance policies will need to weigh up all factors and the available information. There is an expectation that signatories ensure, as far as practicable, that the risks outlined in Clause 16D of the Code are covered.  

Pandemic planning

If you would like to review your pandemic plan, the Ministry of Education guidance will assist you through that process:

Review your pandemic plan

Emergency Management planning (includes advice for pandemics)

If you would like to review your pandemic plan, the Ministry of Education guidance will assist you through that process:

Review your pandemic plan

Emergency Management planning (includes advice for pandemics)

The Emergency Management Plan template also includes provision for pandemics:

Emergency management plan template [DOC, 719 KB]

Keep an eye on our website and the Ministry of Health website for updates: 

COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) guidance – Ministry of Health

Supporting the wellbeing of students

A number of your community may be feeling worried about COVID-19 (novel coronavirus). 

Here is some advice about how you can support the wellbeing of your students and their families:

COVID-19 and wellbeing

Supporting the wellbeing of students

A number of your community may be feeling worried about COVID-19 (novel coronavirus). 

Here is some advice about how you can support the wellbeing of your students and their families:

COVID-19 and wellbeing

Advice for students, parents and whānau

This section was updated on Thursday 9 April at 12.50pm

Supporting students’ learning at home 

We have developed a package of options to support students learning at home when Term 2 begins on April 15.

This involves us working closely with schools. In the first instance you should contact your school if you have any issues or are concerned about your child’s learning at home. If you have difficulty contacting your child’s school and the teacher doesn’t contact you, please get in touch with your nearest office of the Ministry of Education.

Online resources

We are enhancing the resources available in two relatively new online spaces: Learning from home and Ki te Ao Mārama

They include a range of resources for parents and whānau, teachers and leaders, for early learning through to senior secondary. Talk to your teacher about what resources are right for your child.

Access to devices and the internet

We have worked with principals to identify students who are likely to need additional resources, devices, internet connectivity or hard copy learning materials, to continue their learning from home when the school terms resumes on April 15.

We won’t be able to meet everyone’s needs all at once but we will provide as much as we can, as soon as it is available. We will be targeting the greatest need first. We will focus on connecting students in senior secondary school working towards NCEA – to minimise disruption for those working towards a qualification – and on those with greatest need due to disadvantage. We will then move down the year levels from years 10 to 1

Hard copy packs

We know many of you have already received material from your school for learning at home. We are also providing hard packs to support students who don’t have technology at home.

Television channels

Two television channels are due to start from April 15. They will broadcast education-related content – one for English medium and one for Māori medium, including content targeted for Pacific and other communities.

The broadcasts will run over six and a half hours during the day, and include specialised content to support your learning.

Technology

Technology is great whether it’s for information, learning, keeping connected or for games, music and videos. Here's a reminder about how to keep young people safe in an online world where, unfortunately, there are some predators. 

Keeping safe online

Advice for parents who are essential workers

Where possible, essential workers need to make their own arrangements for childcare from Thursday 26 March until the end of the lockdown, due to limited capacity.
 
Where this is not possible alternative arrangements have been made so essential workers can continue to work.

Essential businesses - covid19.govt.nz

What essential workers need to know when making their own arrangements?

Essential workers will need to use their existing networks for in-home care, for example a neighbour, relative, friend or current carer/nanny who can come to their house, or provide childcare in their own home. There are Public Health rules that must be observed:

  • The person caring for your child becomes part of your self-isolating group.
  • This group must remain the same for the whole period.
  • The carer must not care for children from other households (other than their own) over the same period.
  • If a child or carer becomes unwell, they must stay at home. 

If essential workers do not have access to childcare through their own networks:

If essential workers are unable to access childcare, the government will fund other licensed childcare providers (for example through PORSE, Barnados and Edubase / Home Grown Kids) to provide in home care to the children aged 0-14 of essential workers. All providers will provide care for ages 0-14. The carer would be subject to the same Public Health rules as set out above.
 
For the purposes of providing care to children of essential workers, the in home carer will be classified as an essential worker in both cases.

Initial list of contact details for providers

Check the full list on the Work and Income website:

COVID-19: In-home childcare for essential workers - Work and Income website

Parent fees while ECE services are closed

As early learning services are closed, we are encouraging them to be flexible and reasonable about parent fees during this period.

The Government is continuing to support early learning services through the ECE subsidy funding with no claw backs during the lockdown period, and services can also apply for the Covid-19 Wage Subsidy.

Advice for unwell students

If you have a particular concern about your child or yourself, Healthline has a dedicated line for COVID-19 enquiries with translators and interpreters available 24/7 in 150 languages:

If you intend to visit your GP or after-hours medical centre, phone ahead first to let them know.

COVID-19 is now a notifiable infectious disease and treatment for people who have, or who are suspected of having. COVID-19 is publicly funded under the infectious disease exception, to the extent appropriate in the circumstances to manage risks to other persons. This covers anyone in New Zealand, regardless of visa/citizenship status or length of time in the country.

Please note that the services are limited to:

  • Diagnosis.
  • Treatment of the person’s infectious or quarantinable disease.
  • Follow-up services.
  • Contact tracing services.
  • Surveillance of persons who are liable to quarantine under the Health Act 1956.

More information is available on the Ministry of Health's website:

People receiving treatment for infectious diseases - Ministry of Health

COVID-19 health advice for the public – Ministry of Health

Talking to children about COVID-19 

Children look to adults for guidance on how to react to stressful events such as COVID-19. Parents, caregivers, whānau and teachers will have a particularly important part to play in reassuring children at this time. 

Talking to children about COVID-19

What are my options for accommodation when self-isolating?

Self-isolation requires that you have accommodation that is stable and that you limit your contact with any other people living in the same dwelling; e.g. a separate room and, if possible, separate bathroom.

A private home/flat is preferred over shared living arrangements such as hostels, boarding houses, residential halls, or even hotels. Please contact your education provider for appropriate accommodation support.

What if I am in shared accommodation?

You can still share accommodation while self-isolating, so long as you follow the appropriate self-isolation procedures and stay within your bubble.

Advice for homestay host families

The health of students and homestay families is a priority.

If you have concerns about hosting students who are returning from overseas, or may have been exposed to the coronavirus, you should contact the student’s school.

Supporting students’ learning at home

To support distance learning, we have two new online spaces available: Learning from home and Ki te Ao Mārama

They include a range of resources for parents and whānau, teachers and leaders, for early learning through to senior secondary. Talk to your teacher about what resources are right for your child.

Access to devices and the internet

We are in the process of identifying students who are likely to need additional resources, devices, internet connectivity or hard copy learning materials, to continue their learning from home when the school terms resumes on April 15.

We won’t be able to meet everyone’s needs all at once but we will continue to work with you to provide as much as we can, as it is available. We will be targeting the greatest need first.

Hard copy packs

We know many of you have already provided students with material for home. We are working to provide hard packs for children who don’t have technology at home and we will work with you on the best approach to getting this to those children. Our aim is to provide a supply of these by 15 April, if printing and distribution times make this possible.

Technology

Technology is great whether it’s for information, learning, keeping connected or for games, music and videos. Here's a reminder about how to keep young people safe in an online world where, unfortunately, there are some predators. 

Keeping safe online

International students having accommodation issues

If you are having accommodation issues, please call your education provider first. They are there to help you.

If you are unable to reach them, call Tertiary Education Commission on 0800 123 797 Monday to Friday.

You can also contact a Ministry of Education office near you Monday to Friday:

Ministry of Education regional office contacts

Or you can call NZQA on 0800 697 296 Monday to Friday.

您遇到住宿问题了吗?

国际留学生,您好!
如果您遇到住宿问题,请先致电您的学校,他们会帮助您。
如果您无法联系到他们,请在周一至周五致电高等教育委员会(Tertiary Education Commission):0800 123 797。
您也可以在周一至周五联系您附近的教育部办公室 Ministry of Education regional office contacts (教育部区域办公室联系方式)
或者可以在周一至周五致电新西兰学历认证局(NZQA),电话:0800 697 296。

您有住宿問題嗎?

國際留學生,您好!

如果您有住宿問題,請先致電您的學校,他們會幫助您。

如果您無法聯繫到他們,請在周一至週五致電高等教育委員會(Tertiary Education Commission:0800 123 797。

您也可以在周一至週五聯繫您附近的教育部辦公室 Ministry of Education regional office contacts(教育部區域辦公室聯繫方式)

或者您可以在周一至週五致電紐西蘭資格認證局(NZQA), 電話:0800 697 296。

If I can't start my courses on time, how will I continue my study?

In the first instance, you should contact your education provider. Education providers are being encouraged to consider flexible learning arrangements such as online learning/blended delivery, offering extra semesters, or changing the timetables for programmes to support students when they do arrive in New Zealand.

If you are unable to enter New Zealand and this impacts your ability to participate in regularly scheduled course programmes, you should contact your education provider to discuss distance learning options, or provision of refunds for fees and/or hostel deposits if enrolments are deferred.

If you are concerned about how changes may affect your student visa, contact Immigration New Zealand or check their website for general information about student visas relating to COVID-19:

Visa information – Immigration New Zealand

I would like to defer my study, what are my options?

Providers should advise affected students about arrangements to protect their fees if they decide to defer their studies. In the event a student decides to withdraw from their programme of study, providers should ensure students are made aware of any potential refunds or deferral of course fees.

Will my insurance cover me for extra costs related to COVID-19?

As the novel coronavirus is now considered a “known event” by many international student insurance providers, your insurance may not cover you if you have had to change or cancel travel or accommodation bookings. However, each insurance provider has different coverage, and you should contact your insurance provider to discuss your situation.

Is there any assistance to help cover the costs of these changes to travel, fees, and accommodation?

You should contact your education provider and/or insurance provider for up-to-date advice on any possible claims as a result of COVID-19.

Your education provider may have financial aid available to its students, and/or additional provision for students affected by COVID-19 and the related travel restrictions and self-isolation. Contact your education provider to discuss your options.

If I can’t attend classes as I am self-isolating, what happens to my attendance records?

Immigration instructions require that international students attend their programme of study at all times, unless there are genuine reasons for absence. If you are following New Zealand Ministry of Health guidelines for self-isolation and cannot attend classes, attendance records should note that the absence is due to genuine circumstances.

If providers have concerns about how changes may affect a student’s visa, contact Immigration New Zealand or check their website for general information about student visas relating to COVID-19: https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/media-centre/news-notifications/coronavirus-update-inz-response

Students/families experiencing discrimination

If you or someone you know is experiencing racial discrimination related to COVID-19, the Human Rights Commission offers a free and confidential enquiries and complaints service which you can use.

This kind of behaviour is absolutely unacceptable, and we encourage you to make a complaint:

NetSafe also offer advice for those experiencing online race-based abuse:

Race-based online abuse – NetSafe

Advice for tertiary students

This section was updated on Friday 3 April at 10.40am

Alert level 4

Information about the four level alert system

Help with essential food and supplies

If you don't have the essentials you need to get through lockdown (such as food, medication or cleaning supplies), try calling a, neighbour, a friend or family member who lives nearby, or see if you can do your shopping online.

If these options are not available to you, you can call your local Civil Defence Emergency Management Group. The service operates seven days a week from 7am to 7pm.

Civil Defence Emergency Management helpline phone numbers

What happens to my studies now my provider has to close?

  • All providers have closed for face-to-face teaching.
  • They are busy trying to make alternative arrangements to deliver your study.
  • So the message is stay in touch with your provider in the usual way through their website, Facebook and other social media pages and keep checking your email.    
  • It is really important not to make any quick or reactive decisions to withdraw from study.

To keep getting your Student Allowance or Loan you need to be enrolled 

  • You will continue to receive your weekly StudyLink payments if you remain enrolled – so please stay enrolled.
  • Answers to questions in relation to Student Allowance and Living Cost payments can be found on StudyLink’s website.
  • If students need extra help during this time they can find information about emergency assistance on the StudyLink website.

Information about student loans and allowances – StudyLink

Extra financial help for students – StudyLink

What is available to support me financially right now?

  • The Ministry of Social Development may be able to help you with other costs while you’re self-isolating. This includes costs that are urgent, unexpected or harder to cover, such as food and accommodation. You can find out more at  StudyLink- Urgent and unexpected costs
  • Your tertiary provider may also be offering extra help for students during this time, so it’s worth looking on their website / Facebook page, or even contacting them directly to ask.

If I withdraw from my courses, will this have an impact on my Fees-Free entitlement?

  • Yes, this could have an impact on your Fees Free entitlement.
  • We are working urgently to figure out how we will be able to help Fees-Free students who are disadvantaged because they had to withdraw. 
  • Stay enrolled in your courses if you can, and continue to engage with your provider about options available to you to continue your studies this year. 

What if I can’t afford to pay my rent because I’ve lost my part-time job?

  • If you have been working part-time to help cover your tertiary education costs, you may be eligible for the wage subsidy scheme Government has put in place. You can find further information at COVID-19 Financial support and COVID-19 Wage subsidy
  • There is now a freeze on rental increases. This means your landlord cannot increase your rent unless the increase occurred before lockdown. To find out more, visit rent freeze and tenancy terminations
  • You can ask your landlord to reduce your rent temporarily. The Residential Tenancies Act allows a tenant/s and landlord to agree that the tenant/s can pay a reduced rent temporarily. This reduced rent can be for a specific amount of time or until a specific event occurs. Once that time is up, the rent goes back up to its previous amount.

What if I’m in a hall of residence/hostel/homestay? 

  • Some of you may still be in your accommodation because you can’t get home or it’s the only accommodation you have.
  • Please don’t be concerned, your accommodation provider is there to help you
  • Nothing will change until new arrangements have been made for all students.
  • The main thing is to just follow the advice and directions from the Ministry of Health to self-isolate and be super vigilant with your personal distancing and hygiene MOH guidelines
  • Your provider is there to provide support and to help you to access medical services if you need them. 

Wellbeing – looking after yourself 

  • If you’re feeling anxious or lonely, there are a number of free counselling services you can use. You can find contact details for these services and other advice on the NauMai NZ Feeling lonely, homesick or depressed page
  • There is also information on this page to help you keep in contact with friends and family.  It is more important than ever to maintain these connections.
  • It is ok to go for a walk. You do not have to be in your room all the time. However you must maintain a two meter distance from other people at all times.

Feeling lonely, homesick or depressed – NauMai NZ

What if my academic performance is affected?

If any of the actions taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in New Zealand impact your ability to complete or pass your course, your provider and StudyLink will take this into account if you apply for a Student Allowance or Loan again in the future.

I am worried about rent increasing or being evicted from my flat

There is now a freeze on rental increases. A rent increase notice from your landlord won’t have the effect of increasing your rent, unless the increase had already taken effect.

COVID-19: Rent Freeze and Tenancy Terminations – Ministry of Housing and Urban Development

Post-graduate students

  • If you received a scholarship, contact the organisation that gave you the scholarship to discuss your situation. You could ask if the scholarship can be changed to provide continuing support for your studies once you are able to start again. This might include whether the scholarship can be used over a longer period, or can be held for later use if you need to stop study for now.
  • If you have a research deadline, contact your provider to work through the implications for your research. They may not have an answer immediately, and the answer will likely depend on your circumstances and the type of research you are doing.  

Travel and visa advice for international students 

If you are a student intending to travel, you should speak to your education provider about travel arrangements.  They are working with the government and have all the latest and accurate information. 

Under Alert Level 4, international students are now able to leave New Zealand on scheduled commercial or foreign-government assisted charter flights.

You must have a confirmed booking and a valid international ticket to travel to the airport and depart New Zealand.:

To get to an airport, you must be able to:

  • drive in private transport
  • complete a trip on public transport, taxi or uber ride take a single domestic flight (commercial or charted) to either Auckland or Christchurch International Airport.

Students travelling to airports must follow the Alert 4 health and safety advice to protect themselves and others. These measures include ensuring 2 metres distance between people, coughing/sneezing into an elbow, washing and drying hands often.

Educational providers must ensure certain requirements are met under the Code. These include:

  • Clear and timely communication with students and parents about travel. Parents and students should only be consenting to travel with an informed understanding of the relevant risks and the possibility of changing plans. 
  • A transfer of care plan for under 18 students that is agreed to in writing (digitally) by the student’s parent or legal guardian.
  • Appropriate and safe supervision for students under 18 to ensure that the wellbeing of the student is maintained during their transfer of care.

We have included a check list on the following page to assist you with students under 18.

COVID-19 bulletin for tertiary providers and international students - 2 April 2020 

For international students with visas that will soon expire, it is very important that you apply for a new one before it expires. An interim visa will be issued if the current visa expires while a new visa is being assessed

New Zealand tertiary institutions, all government education agencies, and the Ministry of Social Development will do everything they can to assist you to continue studying during this uncertain time.

We are also providing regular bulletins for tertiary students as the situation evolves. 

COVID-19 bulletins for tertiary providers and students

FAQs for signatories - students on commercial or repatriation flights

More information

Talk to your education provider about your course, and any questions or concerns you have about being able to continue to study.

International students having accommodation issues

If you are having accommodation issues, please call your education provider first. They are there to help you. 

If you are unable to reach them, call Tertiary Education Commission on 0800 123 797 Monday to Friday.

You can also contact a Ministry of Education office near you Monday to Friday:

Ministry of Education regional office contacts

Or you can call NZQA on 0800 697 296 Monday to Friday.

您遇到住宿问题了吗?

国际留学生,您好!
如果您遇到住宿问题,请先致电您的学校,他们会帮助您。
如果您无法联系到他们,请在周一至周五致电高等教育委员会(Tertiary Education Commission):0800 123 797。
您也可以在周一至周五联系您附近的教育部办公室 Ministry of Education regional office contacts (教育部区域办公室联系方式)
或者可以在周一至周五致电新西兰学历认证局(NZQA),电话:0800 697 296。

您有住宿問題嗎?

國際留學生,您好!

如果您有住宿問題,請先致電您的學校,他們會幫助您。

如果您無法聯繫到他們,請在周一至週五致電高等教育委員會(Tertiary Education Commission:0800 123 797。

您也可以在周一至週五聯繫您附近的教育部辦公室 Ministry of Education regional office contacts(教育部區域辦公室聯繫方式)

或者您可以在周一至週五致電紐西蘭資格認證局(NZQA), 電話:0800 697 296。

If I can't start my courses on time, how will I continue my study?

In the first instance, you should contact your education provider to discuss distance learning options, or provision of refunds for fees and/or hostel deposits if enrolments are deferred.

If you are concerned about how changes may affect your student visa, contact Immigration New Zealand or check their website for general information about student visas relating to COVID-19:

Visa information – Immigration New Zealand 

I would like to defer my study, what are my options?

Providers should advise affected students about arrangements to protect their fees if they decide to defer their studies. In the event a student decides to withdraw from their programme of study, providers should ensure students are made aware of any potential refunds or deferral of course fees. 

Is there any assistance to help cover the costs of these changes to travel, fees, and accommodation?

You should contact your education provider and/or insurance provider for up-to-date advice on any possible claims as a result of COVID-19.

Your education provider may have financial aid available to its students, and/or additional provision for students affected by COVID-19 and the related travel restrictions and self-isolation. Contact your education provider to discuss your options. 

Students/families experiencing discrimination

If you or someone you know is experiencing racial discrimination related to COVID-19, the Human Rights Commission offers a free and confidential enquiries and complaints service which you can use.

This kind of behaviour is absolutely unacceptable, and we encourage you to make a complaint:

NetSafe also offer advice for those experiencing online race-based abuse:

Race-based online abuse – NetSafe

Advice for Ministry Suppliers

This section was updated on Thursday 2 April at 11.25am.

As the COVID-19 situation evolves we want to update you on what we’re doing to manage the impact on our people, schools, suppliers and ongoing projects.

Update for all Ministry suppliers

  • The Ministry will continue to adhere to the Government’s new payment-term expectations of 10 days for processing supplier payments. Please ensure include the Purchase Order Number on your invoice to ensure prompt processing.
  • We are working with other Government agencies to determine an appropriate response to support industry and ensure economic activity is maintained in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic. Further advice will follow in due course on resolving contractual and commercial issues that arise as a result of Covid-19 with our suppliers. 
  • For further clarification please email our dedicated mailbox for suppliers: askus.procurement@education.govt.nz
  • Access to school sites is not permitted during Covid-19 Response Level 4. The only exception to this is where there is an immediate threat to maintain human health and safety, for example fire, flood, gas leak, etc. If there is an emergency, Police and/or Fire and Emergency NZ will respond.
  • For suppliers working on school construction projects, we request that any works that were unprotected are now reasonably protected. The Ministry will cover the cost of all reasonable works required to protect the site.
  • Services that can be completed remotely or delivered online should continue to be, or planned to be, delivered remotely if possible.
  • Our staff will be in contact with our suppliers throughout the duration of the suspension to discuss the impact of Covid-19 and appropriate solutions will be agreed on a case-by-case basis.  We are also working with our suppliers on protocols for safely continuing work once we transition to other Covid-19 Response Levels.

Contracts coming up for renewal, tenders in or about to go to market

  • We recognise that the current situation may have impacted your ability to respond to requests for information or tenders within the set deadline. Equally, it has impacted our ability to progress through the various stages of many of our procurements. If you have queries relating to a specific tender, please contact the nominated Ministry staff member for the specific tender or send your query to askus.procurement@education.govt.nz  
  • Ministry staff will be maintaining progress on the existing pipeline of projects where possible, whether in the business case, design or tendering phases. Please note however, some requirements may need to be reviewed, and depending on availability of key personnel, there may be delays.
  • Closing dates for current tenders awaiting market responses are currently being reviewed and revised timeframes will be advised as soon as possible.
  • We will assess each procurement requirement on a case-by-case basis, and tenders not yet released will be prioritised, while considering the market’s ability to respond. There is a possibility that some activities may be deferred until after the Covid-19 Response Level 4 has been lifted.

More information about COVID-19

COVID-19 and wellbeing

Key messages for schools and early learning services

  • Regardless of the current COVID-19 Alert Level, keeping your community informed about what your service or school is doing will help support a calm environment for staff, children, students, families and whānau.
  • Encourage routine whether at home, at school or in early learning; routines are reassuring, and promote health and physical wellbeing.
  • The COVID19.govt.nz website is the key source of information on New Zealand’s response to COVID-19.
  • We will continue to maintain the information on our website and should anything change, will update you as soon as possible by Special Bulletin (emailed to you) or through communications from our regional teams.
  • While physical distancing is important as part of our response to COVID-19, it’s vital for everyone’s wellbeing to stay socially connected, even if you are in lockdown or self-isolating. For example, video calling, social media and phone calling are all great ways to keep connected while following self-isolation or stay at home guidelines.
  • If you know someone who might be struggling in your school or early learning service community, there are a large range of supports in place that may be able to assist including:

 

Supporting families, caregivers, whānau

Distance learning

To support families and whānau with learning for their child while at home, we have two new online spaces available. They include a range of resources for parents and whānau, teachers and leaders, for early learning through to senior secondary.

Supporting wellbeing

We have developed a resource for parents, caregivers and whānau to help children and young people get through the challenges caused by changes in our families and communities. It may also be useful for teachers:

Helping children and young people

There are also a range of fact sheets we have developed:

Further information to support wellbeing:

When school and early learning service premises are open

Some ways you can continue to support your community include:

  • Reassure parents and students about the hygiene practices that you are reinforcing and the cleaning and the care you are taking of their learning environment.
  • Follow up with parents of children and students that may be absent to check in about their health and welfare.
  • Maintain privacy and confidentiality of those seeking health care and those who may be part of any contact investigation.
  • Keep in contact with the family/families affected. Check on their access to supports and help them access support if this is not occurring.
  • Provide timely communication of the risk or lack of risk from associations with products, people, and places.
  • Share accurate information about how the virus spreads.
  • Teach and reinforce preventive measures.
  • Be cautious about the images that are shared. Make sure they do not reinforce stereotypes.
  • Engage with groups in person and through media channels face-book etc., about communicating safely about the disease and the known facts. Reinforce messages about social support and inclusion.
  • Share the need for social support for people who have returned from affected areas and are worried about friends or relatives in the affected region.
  • Encourage families to talk about the virus and how it spreads.
  • Talk with families about developing a plan together to stop its spread and what they will do if they get sick.

Reinforce your whānau or school values:

  • State what they are and that these values support the way we talk about, care for and support others.
  • Support understanding of different lives, different perspectives, and different cultures.

Keep an eye out for inappropriate behaviour:

  • Some individuals may choose to wear face masks, as it is part of their cultural practice to do so to support their hygiene needs.
  • Encourage respect - people are being proactive in keeping themselves and families safe.
  • Every learner has the right to a safe, healthy and supportive learning environment, where they are accepted and respected, and an education that values their identity, language and culture, and those of their family and whānau.
  • Where children and students are not respected, or treated fairly, or discriminated against - respond fairly and effectively.
  • It’s important to remember that if bullying occurs for whatever reason, that bullying prevention is everyone’s responsibility.
  • Speak out against negative behaviours, including negative statements on social media about groups of people, or exclusion of people who pose no risk from regular activities.

You may find some of the information on the bullying free website useful in supporting your children and students and creating a culture of support at this time.

Bullying Free NZ website

Race-based online abuse

You may be aware of inappropriate messages being posted online, particularly on Facebook or other social media platforms. If this is brought to your attention or if you experience online abuse, Netsafe have a free and confidential service to help. The following steps may also stop the abuse:

  1. Make a plan: This type of abuse can be extremely upsetting, but it’s important to think through your approach.
  2. Get help: Talk to someone that you feel you can trust. This could be a close friend or whānau. If you’d rather talk to someone else, you can contact Netsafe, Need to Talk, Lifeline or Youthline.
  3. Keep the evidence: Save texts and emails and take screenshots of anything that might disappear later. Make sure you keep track of dates, what has happened, who you think did it and why. You can follow these instructions if you need help.
  4. Report it: Block or report the abuse. Most social networks have safety centres with tips on how to deal with abuse on the platforms.
  5. There’s also the ability to disable comments on posts and videos on Instagram and YouTube.
  6. Contact Netsafe. They can provide advice and support 7 days a week. You can make a report online, text ‘Netsafe’ to 4282, email at help@netsafe.org.nz or call 0508 638 723.

 Netsafe’s information about race-based online abuse might also help you or your family respond: 

 Netsafe page on race-based online abuse

The New Zealand Human Rights Commission

If you know someone who has experienced racial discrimination, the Human Rights Commission offers a free and confidential enquires and complaints service.

 This kind of behaviour is absolutely unacceptable, and we encourage anyone experiencing discrimination to make a complaint:

Supporting wellbeing of children and students returning to your school/service

We encourage you to plan what the support for returning students and children may look like. Some considerations include:

  • Reinforce with your community that the lockdown or self-isolation period is over and that you are looking forward to welcoming all children or students back.
  • Teachers responsible for student welfare will also need to consider the inclusion of returning students in activities that occur outside of the classroom such as drama, music and sporting teams
  • The teacher responsible for the care and welfare of international students, needs to be in regular contact with returning students. They should ensure there is clear and open communication with parents to assure them of their child’s wellbeing and care.
  • Be aware that for some children, students, their parents, relatives or friends may have been affected by the COVID-19 and this will be a source of worry and concern for the child/student. Gently enquiring about a child’s or student’s parents and friends and how they are maintaining contact, will help. Know that situations will vary for each child/student, as will the willingness for children/students to approach an adult for support. Consider the following support if possible:
    • Facilitating and establishing contact for children/students with parents that may be unwell or can’t be contacted. Consider the use of interpreters.
    • Supporting children/students with safe travel information if they are returning home.

Please consider other wellbeing support by:

  • Being aware and vigilant about rumours, false statements and comments about the COVID-19 or returning students that have the potential to create fear and distrust. Provide ongoing messages about safety and caring for your community during this time.
  • Reassuring children and students by promoting inclusion in the service, classroom and school activities.
  • Making sure children and students know who to contact if they are worried about a peer or friend in the school/ECE community.
  • Making sure children and students know what to do if they are unwell or worried about themselves or someone else i.e contacting Healthline or their GP.
  • Communicating about the Ministry of Health dedicated 0800 number for COVID-19 health advice and information 0800 358 5453 (for international SIMs +64 9 358 5453) – it is free and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Being aware some children and students may not be engaging in a service, classroom and/or school activities, and ensuring staff follow up to support their engagement back to their school or service.

 You may also like to think about how these children and students support each other as a group, possibly including a ‘space’ they can use if they want at their school or service.

 Discuss this with returning children and students as they may have other ideas about what support they need as a group.

Inclusive classroom culture

We encourage you to continue your support for the wellbeing of these children and students as they return to their service or school. You may find the Ministry’s Guide to inclusive classroom culture helpful to support you to promote inclusion.

Ministry Guide to Inclusive Classroom Culture

If you need further support, please do contact your local Ministry of Education office:

Contact details for Ministry of Education local offices 

Key contacts

Healthline

Healthline has a dedicated line for COVID-19 enquiries with translators and interpreters available 24/7 in 150 languages:

Ministry of Health

The Ministry of Health are the lead Government agency providing health advice in New Zealand in response to COVID-19:

COVID-19 – Ministry of Health

Public health units/district health boards

If you need to contact your public health officer: 

Public Health Unit Contacts – Ministry of Health

Unite against COVID-19

This website has everything you need to know about COVID-19 in one place. Learn the simple steps you can take to unite against the virus and slow its spread. Find out what help is available and get the latest updates:

Unite against COVID-19 - covid19.govt.nz

Immigration New Zealand

Keep updated on travel restrictions through the New Zealand Immigration website:

COVID-19 response – Immigration New Zealand

SafeTravel

Advice for New Zealanders living and travelling overseas:

Travel advice – SafeTravel

New Zealand Human Rights Commission

If you know someone who has experienced racial discrimination related to COVID-19, the Human Rights Commission offers a free and confidential enquires and complaints service:

Pastoral care for students

If you have specific questions about pastoral care for domestic or international students, contact the New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA) Code team:

Tenancy Services 

Are you a landlord or a tenant dealing with a coronavirus situation? Make sure you are aware of your rights and responsibilities:

COVID-19: What landlords and tenants need to know – Tenancy Services

World Health Organization (WHO)

Information and guidance from WHO regarding the current outbreak of COVID-19:

COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) – World Health Organization

COVID-19 - information in other languages - Ministry of Health

COVID-19 - Easy Read information - Ministry of Health

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