Example scenarios for sharing personal information

Some Kāhui Ako have sought guidance about what personal information they can share in specific situations.

The example scenarios will be expanded as Kāhui Ako develop or any future law changes affect what can be shared.

Scenario #1

 

Sharing information so it can be aggregated

The Kāhui Ako Lead wants to share personal information with an outside person so that they can aggregate data for the members. The data will be used to monitor progress in achievement across the Kāhui Ako.

You can share the information because the aggregate data will be anonymous.

The Privacy Act 1993 allows sharing of identifiable data if the purpose is to create a dataset that does not identify individuals. This sharing should be covered in the Kāhui Ako privacy protocol in the memorandum of agreement.

Scenario #2

 

Sharing progress and achievement data

 

A Kāhui Ako is partnering with the local iwi. Across school teachers in the Kāhui Ako want to share progress and achievement data for Māori students with the iwi education officer for a joint mentoring programme across the Kāhui Ako.

You can share the information if the iwi and the Kāhui Ako develop a joint privacy protocol and inform parents and caregivers through a privacy statement.

Scenario #3

 

Sharing learning support information

 

The Kāhui Ako is compiling a register of children and young people who require extra support to plan and deliver coordinated learning support across the Kāhui Ako.

You can share the information if you:

  • include it in your privacy protocol
  • inform parents and caregivers what will happen with the information through a privacy statement
  • seek consent to share sensitive information.

Scenario #4

 

Sharing highly sensitive information about suspected abuse

A principal has found out that a child has come to school with a broken arm and he suspects family violence. The Kāhui Ako is meeting in the next room that morning. He’s not sure whether other principals have siblings of the injured child in their schools.

He must inform Oranga Tamariki and/or the New Zealand Police immediately.

He must not discuss the details with the Kāhui Ako group. Oranga Tamariki and the New Zealand Police will ensure the safety of any siblings.

Scenario #5

 

Sharing information for the across school teacher role

 

An across school teacher is spending time in classrooms supporting teachers in other schools or ECE services within the Kāhui Ako and is sometimes privy to personal information about students as part of their role.

You can share the information because it is supporting the student’s education within the school.  This is no different from other situations where an outside person (such as a professional learning and development facilitator) comes into a school to support teachers.

The Kāhui Ako does not need to take any further action. The across school teacher will need to be aware of privacy considerations and not pass the information on further. All teachers should adhere to professional standards and keep personal information confidential.

Scenario #6

 

Sharing information to allow students to attend a class or activity at another school in the Kāhui Ako

 

The Kāhui Ako wants to allow students at one school to access a subject or activity (such as a language class) at another school, which requires some details about them to be shared

You can share the information. It is directly related to the purpose for which it was collected – to support their education. It is no different to current situations where students attend another school, eg for technology classes. The Kāhui Ako does not need to take any further action, but the school will need to seek consent from parents and caregivers for their child to go offsite.

Scenario #7

 

Sharing transience information in the Kāhui Ako

 

The Kāhui Ako wants to identify children and young people with high levels of transience to find ways of better supporting their learning.  This means requesting the information from the Ministry of Education and then discussing the findings and the response in the Kāhui Ako.

You can share the information if you:

  • include it in your Kāhui Ako privacy protocol
  • let parents and caregivers know what will happen with the information through a privacy statement.

 

 

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